Perfectionism Observed Experiential Integration (OEI)

Perfectionism

Perfectionism is considered as a personality trait among many mental health practitioners.  Perfectionists tend to view projects or tasks that are not perfect done, as unworthy. Unless they know that they can do something perfectly, they are unlikely to take it on. They tend not to care much about the learning process while completing a task, but rather about the end project, which, for them, is the most important aspect of any project they undertake.

Procrastination is a great obstacle with people who are perfectionists. They usually don't want to start a task until they are sure that they can do it perfectly. It's common for them to spend an enormous amount of time on a project, making sure that it is done to perfection. Yet, perfectionism prevents these people from appreciating a job well done. Instead, they don't believe that anything they do is good enough and they constantly compare their results with that of other people. They become fixated on achieving perfection.

There is a correlation between perfectionism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and some perfectionists also have OCD.  However, not all people with OCD are perfectionists. While most people with an ambition to succeed and therefore strive to excel in their pursuits, they are not necessarily perfectionists.

Therapy can be very helpful in treating perfectionism. Therapy will help the individual to reframe their thinking to change the end goal of his or her undertakings. A therapist may often help perfectionists recognize that some of the most successful people are not perfectionists at all.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers therapies to address your perfectionism or OCD issues, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Observed Experiential Integration (OEI)

Observed Experiential Integration (OEI) is an effective therapy for people who have experienced trauma, or who have negative thoughts and beliefs to eradicate. It is one of the quicker therapies for this type of issue.

Observed Experiential Integration (OEI) has evolved out of EMDR integrates the visual pathways and both of the brain hemispheres to reduce anxiety and trauma.

During therapy, the client covers or uncovers a single eye at a time, while following the therapist's moving fingers with their eyes. This exercise integrates the two brain hemispheres to allow information to easily travel through the sensory processors and emotional processors.

If you are looking for a therapist who offers Observed Experiential Integration (OEI), please browse our list of practitioners below..

Note: You may narrow your search by selecting more than one filter below.

Hello, and thank you for stopping by. ***I am not currently accepting new clients and will be going on maternity leave in October 2023*** Whether you struggle with patterns of criticism towards self or others,... Read more

Vicki McCabe

MCP, RCC
    • Online booking
Are you stressed at work and can’t sleep at night? Feeling worried, stuck and overwhelmed? I understand that these experiences can lead to feelings of loss – loss of control, loss of freedom, and loss of... Read more

Nikki Hollinson

MCP, RCC
From a young age, I have loved listening to people's stories and being a supportive person helping others explore their inner world. I commonly work with folks who are wanting help with anxiety, perfectionism,... Read more