Death and Dying, Family Issues Critical Incident Stress Management

Death and Dying, Family Issues

Death and dying are common issues faced by people who seek counselling. When a loved one passes away,  dormant feelings of rejection, separation and abandonment in a person's life history tend to resurface. Every client has a different reaction to death and dying, a topic that has been a taboo in many cultures.

Many people are ill-equipped to deal with death and dying, and the process of adjustment that naturally has to follow such an event. During the grieving process, a person tends to react emotionally, but their character usually doesn't change. They are bound to review their relationship with the deceased individual, and express the unfairness of the death. The grieving person might seek out other people to replace the deceased, while at the same time revising their current relationships and personal identity.

The mourning process consists of a number of stages, that most people experience. The stages usually occur consecutively, but it's natural to experience them in a different order, to experience more than one at a time, or to skip a stage altogether. Some people have reported regressing to a previous stage, and moving back and forth between stages.

Unresolved grief can lead to psychopathology. It takes a strong person to seek help and therapy can help you realize that mourning is a natural process that allows you to explore life after the loss of a loved one. It will help you to find new coping mechanisms and help you to move forward with a life that does not include him or her.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who works with clients who are grieving the loss of someone, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Family and Systemic Psychotherapy uses the close interpersonal relationships between family members to help one another. The key to dealing with family issues is to help couples, family members or siblings to explore difficult emotions and thoughts in a safe manner. It helps each member to understand and acknowledge one another's emotions and allow them to express it safely, and in an effective manner.

Family therapy has been shown to be effective for people of all ages who are experiencing family issues or problems in their key systems (relationships) with people with whom they are close. It helps to build relationships and boosts the strengths and self-esteem of everyone in the system. Your family might need intervention if members have substance abuse problems, violent outbursts, if the family experienced a trauma,  if a close family member died or if the family is not functioning at its normal capacity.

This type of therapy enables people to work with one another, instead of on one another and enables families to talk about issues that are causing distress without disrespecting emotions. Instead, it invites engagement of the family members in order to support recovery.

Therapists who address family issues use a range of different approaches to bring about the best results. While group therapy will probably take place once weekly, where the family will all meet with the therapist, individual sessions might be required too. This provides a great supplement to the  family therapy work and is an ideal place for individuals to express their personal family issues that are hard to discuss in front of everyone.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who does family counselling you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Critical Incident Stress Management, Existential-Humanistic

Existential-Humanistic psychotherapies emphasize a collaborative approach to the understanding of the client's full experience rather than just the symptom, thoughts or behaviour. Psychological problems are viewed as the result of a restricted ability to make authentic, meaningful, and self-directed choices about how to live. Consequently, interventions are aimed at increasing client self-awareness and self-understanding. The key words for existential-humanistic therapy are acceptance and growth, responsibility and freedom.

Jeff Morley

Ph.D., R.Psych
I am an experienced Registered Psychologist (#1577), as well as a Board Certified Expert in Traumatic Stress.  In my practice I help people working through different challenges in their life from relationship and... Read more