Trauma Counselling, Hoarding Counsellors

Trauma Counselling, Hoarding

Trauma counselling can assist with a wide range of internal emotional reactions to devastating situations. Some people experience things as more traumatic than others, and therefore they will need help in coping the emotional burdens of an event or situation.

Stressful events such as death of a loved one, rape, abuse, accidents, divorce, violence or bullying can leave people unable to cope or process the emotional burdens. However, it is not only events linked to the individual personally, but also being a witness to events that might leave a person with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This includes being a victim to violence or natural disasters - there is no limit to the causes of trauma.

In the case of PTSD, people can develop many different psychological reactions, as determined by their own coping skills, emotional stability and background. Symptoms of PTSD include a anger, depression, flashbacks, insomnia, nightmares, social withdrawal, loss of self esteem and confidence, and substance abuse.

It takes a strong person to have the courage to stand up and request trauma counselling. This is no time to compare yourself to other people in similar situations, but rather to recognize that everyone has a different reaction to trauma. Therefore, it is important to address the symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder as soon as possible to help you deal with emotions in a healthy way and to overcome the difficulties you are facing. Trauma counselling can help avert potentially more severe psychological disorders, that can occur if PTSD is left untreated.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who provides  trauma counselling to address your posttraumatic stress management issues you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Hoarding is a persistent difficulty discarding or letting go of possessions. The behaviour often has a number of negative effects for the hoarder and often for family members.  These can include emotional, social and physical challenges for the hoarder and those in a relationship with the hoarder.

There is a difference between hoarding and collecting.  Hoarding often produces a sense of shame as many of the items are not longer needed and their presence often affects day to day functioning.  Collecting may be a source of pride because the items are intentionally collected, valued and organized.

If you feel you have a problem with hoarding it may be useful to get help to challenge it and discover what will work to address it and the issues that trigger it.

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Yvonne Paquette

M.S.W., RSW
Do you have responses that seem out of alignment with a triggering event, or emotions coming from unknown places, lingering uncomfortably long? Are you or your loved one navigating addiction, recovery, or a mental... Read more

Kathryn Atkinson

M.A., RCC
    • Online booking
To all of you who feel weary, frightened, overwhelmed, alone: take refuge here. You are not alone. There is hope. Although the waves seem too rough, they can be calmed. Let’s navigate these storms together. I am... Read more