Self-Esteem Issues, Suicide Ideation / Survivor Counsellors

Self-Esteem Issues, Suicide Ideation / Survivor

A positive self-esteem is an essential tool to help someone function as a productive member of society. Our basic sense of worth determines how well we are able to deal with situations and how well we perform in the family, at school, at work and in life.

Having a healthy self-esteem means that we have a sense of self-worth, self-respect and the ability to find the good in yourself. On the contrary, a negative self image can lead to social anxiety, loneliness, self-criticism, shame and even anger. A person with low self-esteem often feels isolated.

Self-esteem issues are usually created in childhood when negative experiences and poor influences and reactions from caregivers stunt the development of a positive self esteem. Self-esteem can also be affected by abuse, or by being different. A person may be stigmatized for his or her social identity, race, social class, behaviors or appearance.

However, a person's self-esteem can also be challenged during adulthood when one experiences marital issues, financial problems, career glitches or legal challenges.

Therapy can help a person come to terms with self-esteem issues. A therapist will help identify the causes of self-esteem issues and help the individual to regain control over circumstances through goal-directed therapy.

It can help someone with low self-esteem to separate who they are from what they have, or how they look in order to overcome low self-esteem issues. Discovering one's worth is a great way to take control of situations and to learn to feel adequate.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers goal directed therapy to address your self-esteem issues, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.
 

** Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-SUICIDE  if you or someone you know is at risk of suicide. **

Suicidal ideation includes any thoughts of potentially fatal self-harm, whether they are fleeting or well-formulated, and applies in the absence of actual suicide. While many people have faced suicidal ideation without having committed the act, many have in fact made attempts and some have succeeded.

People who face suicidal ideation often have many other psychological symptoms that lead them to this condition, including panic attacks, insomnia, anxiety, hopelessness and depression. However, not all people with mental or medical issues consider suicide, but all suicidal ideation incidents should receive urgent attention.  Someone who experiences suicidal ideation may threaten to hurt or kill him or herself, make attempts to find ways to commit suicide; write or talk about their own death; seek revenge, feel unhappy or trapped, and engage in risky behaviors.

People with mood disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are at a higher risk for suicidal ideation, as are people with cancer and AIDS.

It is important for people with suicidal ideation to seek urgent help from an experienced counsellor or therapist. Psychotherapy has been found to be effective in helping people deal with issues of hopelessness. A professional counsellor will explore the circumstances that led to the suicidal ideation and help to restore hope to the client. It will help to resolve underlying causes of suicidal ideation and find coping strategies to curb impulses that lead to self-harm. Therapy will also help the client to reframe his or her perceptions and worldview.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers counselling approaches to address your suicidal ideation issues, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Keisei Anzai

M.A., BCATR
No matter who we are, life has its up and downturns. Happiness is said to be a rich sense of well-being that comes only from knowing our internal self. A large part of what generates happiness is our cognition.... Read more