Retirement, Suicide Ideation / Survivor Counsellors

Retirement, Suicide Ideation / Survivor

Retirement can sometimes bring about mixed emotions. Some people grab the opportunity with both hands, while others have a different vision of it. However, most people do see it as the end of an era and the beginning of a new life with many unknown challenges. It is quite natural to feel a sense of anxiety at the prospect of changing your life so drastically.

People who have had an active, successful career are more likely to become depressed at retirement. However, life expectancy is on the increase and people have more disposable money resources, which contribute to a better quality of life, and that opens up the opportunity for living a new and exciting life.

However, without proper planning and creating structure, there is a lot of insecurity. It is common to feel depressed and overwhelmed. If you feel like nervous about the prospect of retirement, or if you need assistance in deciding what to do with your life when you stop working in formal employment, it might be a good idea to speak to a therapist.

A psychologist or counsellor who offers coaching people before, during and after retirement will help to bring stress symptoms to normal levels, and help you to understand your personal qualities. He or she will help you to find ways to fill up the empty time and finding purpose, using your personal life goals and aspirations as a guide.

Goals change over the years as you evolve as a person and it is important to change your actions to ensure that you live life to the fullest.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers retirement counselling to address your stress, and anxiety due to retirement you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

** Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-SUICIDE  if you or someone you know is at risk of suicide. **

Suicidal ideation includes any thoughts of potentially fatal self-harm, whether they are fleeting or well-formulated, and applies in the absence of actual suicide. While many people have faced suicidal ideation without having committed the act, many have in fact made attempts and some have succeeded.

People who face suicidal ideation often have many other psychological symptoms that lead them to this condition, including panic attacks, insomnia, anxiety, hopelessness and depression. However, not all people with mental or medical issues consider suicide, but all suicidal ideation incidents should receive urgent attention.  Someone who experiences suicidal ideation may threaten to hurt or kill him or herself, make attempts to find ways to commit suicide; write or talk about their own death; seek revenge, feel unhappy or trapped, and engage in risky behaviors.

People with mood disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are at a higher risk for suicidal ideation, as are people with cancer and AIDS.

It is important for people with suicidal ideation to seek urgent help from an experienced counsellor or therapist. Psychotherapy has been found to be effective in helping people deal with issues of hopelessness. A professional counsellor will explore the circumstances that led to the suicidal ideation and help to restore hope to the client. It will help to resolve underlying causes of suicidal ideation and find coping strategies to curb impulses that lead to self-harm. Therapy will also help the client to reframe his or her perceptions and worldview.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers counselling approaches to address your suicidal ideation issues, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

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Alexia Brown

M.Ed., RCC
I am a Registered Clinical Counsellor. I attained a bachelor's degree in Psychology and master's degree in Counselling Psychology in 2007, from the University of British Columbia, where I was also a teaching and... Read more