Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Retirement Counsellors

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Retirement

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is an anxiety disorder that usually starts within the three months of a traumatic incident. It has been reported that in rare cases, PTSD symptoms may only occur after a number of years.

Three groups of symptoms are present in people with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Increased anxiety / emotional arousal includes anger or irritability, overwhelming shame or guilt, sleeplessness and self-destructive behaviour. The second group of symptoms, known as intrusive memories, causes flashbacks to the traumatic event and upsetting dreams. The third group of symptoms that a Post Traumatic Stress Disorder patient may experience, includes emotional numbing or avoidance. This group of symptoms includes memory problems, poor concentration, feeling emotionally numb, a sense of hopelessness, and an avoidance of activities that the person used to find enjoyable.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder symptoms may be present for a while, disappear and then return again. General stress may increase the symptoms, as can reminders of the traumatic incident.

Therapists who address  Post Traumatic Stress Disorder generally use one, or a combination of trauma therapies to treat it. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is commonly used and can help a person to change their reactions to traumatic memories.

Exposure therapy can help a person reduce the amount of fear related to the feelings and thoughts associated with past traumatic events. Cognitive therapy helps a person to change the way he or she thinks about the event and the aftermath of a traumatic incident. It will help a person to identify thoughts that cause fear and anger, and learn ways to replace those thoughts with less stressful and more empowering thoughts.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and related issues you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Retirement can sometimes bring about mixed emotions. Some people grab the opportunity with both hands, while others have a different vision of it. However, most people do see it as the end of an era and the beginning of a new life with many unknown challenges. It is quite natural to feel a sense of anxiety at the prospect of changing your life so drastically.

People who have had an active, successful career are more likely to become depressed at retirement. However, life expectancy is on the increase and people have more disposable money resources, which contribute to a better quality of life, and that opens up the opportunity for living a new and exciting life.

However, without proper planning and creating structure, there is a lot of insecurity. It is common to feel depressed and overwhelmed. If you feel like nervous about the prospect of retirement, or if you need assistance in deciding what to do with your life when you stop working in formal employment, it might be a good idea to speak to a therapist.

A psychologist or counsellor who offers coaching people before, during and after retirement will help to bring stress symptoms to normal levels, and help you to understand your personal qualities. He or she will help you to find ways to fill up the empty time and finding purpose, using your personal life goals and aspirations as a guide.

Goals change over the years as you evolve as a person and it is important to change your actions to ensure that you live life to the fullest.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers retirement counselling to address your stress, and anxiety due to retirement you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

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Susan Higginbottom

Ph.D., R.Psych