Perfectionism, Retirement Counsellors

Perfectionism, Retirement

Perfectionism is considered as a personality trait among many mental health practitioners.  Perfectionists tend to view projects or tasks that are not perfect done, as unworthy. Unless they know that they can do something perfectly, they are unlikely to take it on. They tend not to care much about the learning process while completing a task, but rather about the end project, which, for them, is the most important aspect of any project they undertake.

Procrastination is a great obstacle with people who are perfectionists. They usually don't want to start a task until they are sure that they can do it perfectly. It's common for them to spend an enormous amount of time on a project, making sure that it is done to perfection. Yet, perfectionism prevents these people from appreciating a job well done. Instead, they don't believe that anything they do is good enough and they constantly compare their results with that of other people. They become fixated on achieving perfection.

There is a correlation between perfectionism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and some perfectionists also have OCD.  However, not all people with OCD are perfectionists. While most people with an ambition to succeed and therefore strive to excel in their pursuits, they are not necessarily perfectionists.

Therapy can be very helpful in treating perfectionism. Therapy will help the individual to reframe their thinking to change the end goal of his or her undertakings. A therapist may often help perfectionists recognize that some of the most successful people are not perfectionists at all.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers therapies to address your perfectionism or OCD issues, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Retirement can sometimes bring about mixed emotions. Some people grab the opportunity with both hands, while others have a different vision of it. However, most people do see it as the end of an era and the beginning of a new life with many unknown challenges. It is quite natural to feel a sense of anxiety at the prospect of changing your life so drastically.

People who have had an active, successful career are more likely to become depressed at retirement. However, life expectancy is on the increase and people have more disposable money resources, which contribute to a better quality of life, and that opens up the opportunity for living a new and exciting life.

However, without proper planning and creating structure, there is a lot of insecurity. It is common to feel depressed and overwhelmed. If you feel like nervous about the prospect of retirement, or if you need assistance in deciding what to do with your life when you stop working in formal employment, it might be a good idea to speak to a therapist.

A psychologist or counsellor who offers coaching people before, during and after retirement will help to bring stress symptoms to normal levels, and help you to understand your personal qualities. He or she will help you to find ways to fill up the empty time and finding purpose, using your personal life goals and aspirations as a guide.

Goals change over the years as you evolve as a person and it is important to change your actions to ensure that you live life to the fullest.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers retirement counselling to address your stress, and anxiety due to retirement you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

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Brenda Dineen

M.Ed., RCC
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Kari-Ann Thor

M.Ed., RCC