Job Transition, Retirement Counsellors

Job Transition, Retirement

Job transition, like many other changes, can be stressful. Many people fear change and while a job transition is often an exciting prospect with additional perks and more money, it can still require some adjustments that might leave you feeling stressed, anxious and overwhelmed.

In some cases, job transitions are out of your control. When you are forced to take a transfer to a different department, there can be an increased workload with a lot of new processes and systems to learn. A transfer to another city is a major transition, particularly if you have to commute daily or weekly, or if it requires for you to move away ahead of your family. The stress of learning the ropes of a new job while getting used to living in a new home, in a new city and maintaining relationships with loved ones at home, could leave you wondering whether you have made the right decision.

Some career transitions are even more difficult. If downscaling, retrenchment or illness forced you to put your dream career on hold, or step away from it completely, it could leave you feeling hopeless and depressed.

Therapy is a must if your career has left you feeling stressed, overwhelmed, hopeless, bored, or depressed. With the help of a therapist and cognitive behavior therapy, you can gain a new perspective on your situation and regain the passion you once had. It can re-energize you emotionally and help you to turn your weaknesses into career-optimizing strengths. Most people spend about one third of their lives working and it is essential to make sure those hours are as happy as possible.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers career counselling to address job transition issues, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Retirement can sometimes bring about mixed emotions. Some people grab the opportunity with both hands, while others have a different vision of it. However, most people do see it as the end of an era and the beginning of a new life with many unknown challenges. It is quite natural to feel a sense of anxiety at the prospect of changing your life so drastically.

People who have had an active, successful career are more likely to become depressed at retirement. However, life expectancy is on the increase and people have more disposable money resources, which contribute to a better quality of life, and that opens up the opportunity for living a new and exciting life.

However, without proper planning and creating structure, there is a lot of insecurity. It is common to feel depressed and overwhelmed. If you feel like nervous about the prospect of retirement, or if you need assistance in deciding what to do with your life when you stop working in formal employment, it might be a good idea to speak to a therapist.

A psychologist or counsellor who offers coaching people before, during and after retirement will help to bring stress symptoms to normal levels, and help you to understand your personal qualities. He or she will help you to find ways to fill up the empty time and finding purpose, using your personal life goals and aspirations as a guide.

Goals change over the years as you evolve as a person and it is important to change your actions to ensure that you live life to the fullest.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers retirement counselling to address your stress, and anxiety due to retirement you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Deborah Braun

M.A., RCC