Grief and Loss - General, Smoking Cessation Counsellors

Grief and Loss - General, Smoking Cessation

Grief is a natural part of dealing with the loss of a loved one, or a situation, or a way in which we see ourselves. Loss requires that we change the way things used to be and find a new way to restructure our lives accordingly. It's common for people to fear change, particularly if a part of us, or a person we loved deeply, is no longer there. It leaves a gap that has to be filled, but nothing can replace the person who has left us behind.

People deal with loss in many different ways, but the desired end result is the same - trying to piece together the puzzle to the best of our ability, without the missing piece. We also go through the various stages of grief at varying speeds and intensities. Dealing with all the emotions that form part of grief is what makes support so very important.

Time is of the essence during the grieving period, and something we sometimes tend to rush. That's why it's so useful to speak to a therapist who does grief counselling during this time.

A therapist will help you understand that what you are feeling is completely normal and even expected. Medical professionals are aware of the wide range of natural responses to grief and loss and are generally reluctant to diagnose mental illness while a person is in a period of bereavement. However, if depression is present, medication is likely to be prescribed.

Grief therapy will help you to accept the loss and be able to talk about it without breaking down. You will learn to identify and express your emotions regarding the loss and learn to make decisions without your loved one.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist does grief counselling to address your grief and loss you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Smoking cessation can be tough, but knowing that there are several options and by preparing yourself mentally for the process, you can make it easier on yourself.

Tobacco smoking is a psychological habit and a physical addiction. Nicotine is addictive because it offers a temporary high, and when you eliminate that you will experience physical symptoms, such as cravings and other withdrawal symptoms.

Many people habitually smoke to help them cope with boredom, anxiety, depression and stress. After doing it habitually for a while, it can become ritualistic - an automatic response. You will find that you smoke automatically as part of other activities. Socially, smoking is a way in which people relate to one another.

Successful smoking cessation requires a change in the routines or habits, as well as beating the addiction. More people are looking for healthier options to quit smoking than using nicotine patches and prescription medications.  Many therapists now offer smoking cessation counselling and use a wide range of techniques and approaches to address tobacco addiction.

Hypnosis is a common method that helps people to create negative associations with cigarettes while the client is in a deep state of relaxation. It is nothing like what stage hypnotists do, and is in fact a serious and effective therapy for many. Cognitive behavioural therapy is a fantastic approach that helps people establish new habits to cope with smoking cessation. The therapist will help you to understand the reason why you smoke, and explore the associated emotions and feelings. You can quit smoking with the help of an experienced smoking cessation therapist.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers counselling approaches to address your smoking cessation issues, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Mark Ring

M.A., RCC
I am a Registered Clinical Counsellor with a Masters Degree in Counselling Psychology. With over fifteen years of experience and a commitment to ongoing education/training I can help you.  Whether you need a... Read more