Family Caregiver Stress, Postpartum Depression Counsellors

Family Caregiver Stress, Postpartum Depression

Family caregiver stress is not a sign that you don't love the person you are looking after. In fact, even professionally trained caregivers who are hired to take care of someone can become tired and experience the symptoms of stress that a family caregiver might experience. Being responsible for someone physical and psychological wellbeing places tremendous strain on a person, particularly if it's a loved one.

Whether you are taking care of a spouse or a parent after surgery for a few weeks, or raising a child with emotional or physical disabilities, the situation presents a set of unique and difficult circumstances. It's only natural to feel overwhelmed and experience embarrassment, shame, sadness, grief, guilt, disappointment, fear, anger, anxiety and depression.

The major factor that contributes to family caregiver stress is the fact that taking care of someone else can isolate you from other people. The patient usually requires ongoing, extensive care. Many people, especially those who took care of themselves before becoming incapacitated, tend to become difficult and moody as the result of losing their independence. Afterwards, they tend to be wracked by guilt.

The caretaker, in turn, has to cope not only with his or her emotions, but also with that of the patient. While caretakers usually enjoy their work, and love taking care of people, particularly loved ones, it can be exhausting and emotionally draining. Also, there is usually very little time left for self-care.

Psychotherapy can help to address family caregiver stress, particularly when the carer feels that he or she lacks support, or has become anxious, overwhelmed, isolated or depressed.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers family therapies to address your family caregiver stress  issues, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Postpartum depression affects nearly a quarter of all new mothers. Pregnant women who feel sad, blue or down, are at an ever greater risk of postpartum depression. Women who are taking anti-depressants before, will have to stop when they fall pregnant, causing increased feelings of depression.

It is common for new mothers to be afraid to discuss postpartum depression and their thoughts and feelings for fear of being judged as bad mothers. Unless these emotions are discussed with a professional, it could escalate to worse problems.

The most common symptoms of baby blues include anger, sadness, numbness, loss of appetite, trouble sleeping and mood swings. However, postpartum depression affects your functioning significantly and symptoms could include too much or too little sleep, lack of motivation and energy, restlessness and mood swings, trouble with decision making, lots of crying, feelings of worthlessness, and memory problems. Feelings of worthlessness may cause you to withdraw from family and friends. Aches, pains and stomach problems may persist, making it hard to take care of a baby. A new mother with postpartum depression may lose interest in activities she used to enjoy.

The dangers of postpartum depression includes thoughts of the mother hurting herself or her baby, or a total lack of interest in the baby. Some mothers are unable to care for themselves or for their babies.

Professional help is essential for women suffering from postpartum depression to change their perceptions about themselves. A therapist will help a new mother adjust to the changes brought about by motherhood and the changes in hormones and lifestyle and the dynamics of being responsible for a new life.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers postpartum depression counselling and other women's issues you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

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Norma Hoeppner

M.S.W., RSW
In private practice since 2007, Norma has been a dynamic clinical therapist across diverse health settings since 1989. Currently she practices with Clear Counselling Inc. in Vancouver, as well as an office on... Read more