Chronic Illness, Family Caregiver Stress Counsellors

Chronic Illness, Family Caregiver Stress

Chronic illness has the ability to affect you in more ways than just medically. In fact, it can impact you psychologically. The degree of impact is dependent on the person's personality and the circumstances before the diagnosis. Support structure plays an important role on a person's ability to cope, but oftentimes, a person has to go through various stages of dealing with the condition before they are able to adjust to the realities of the chronic illness.

When a person is diagnosed with a chronic illness, he or she will go through a number of stages similar to the stages of grief. Denial, disbelief and shock are just some of the emotions a person experiences when a diagnosis is made, and it's natural for them to resist major changes. Eventually, they will become exhausted, when all they really want to do is to recover. At that point, fear and anxiety will set in and worry in the face of uncertainty of the future.

Sadness, grief and depression are common emotions when they consider the possibility of lost goals, hopes and dreams. Losing independence is a real fear, which becomes inevitable if an illness progresses and that brings about the fear of being a burden to loved ones, which brings on more anger, resentment and even shame.

Counselling can help a person to deal with the emotions relating to chronic illness and to cope with the stress and anxieties of accepting and coping with life changes. It will help to regain personal control over life and yourself.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who works with in chronically ill individuals you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Family caregiver stress is not a sign that you don't love the person you are looking after. In fact, even professionally trained caregivers who are hired to take care of someone can become tired and experience the symptoms of stress that a family caregiver might experience. Being responsible for someone physical and psychological wellbeing places tremendous strain on a person, particularly if it's a loved one.

Whether you are taking care of a spouse or a parent after surgery for a few weeks, or raising a child with emotional or physical disabilities, the situation presents a set of unique and difficult circumstances. It's only natural to feel overwhelmed and experience embarrassment, shame, sadness, grief, guilt, disappointment, fear, anger, anxiety and depression.

The major factor that contributes to family caregiver stress is the fact that taking care of someone else can isolate you from other people. The patient usually requires ongoing, extensive care. Many people, especially those who took care of themselves before becoming incapacitated, tend to become difficult and moody as the result of losing their independence. Afterwards, they tend to be wracked by guilt.

The caretaker, in turn, has to cope not only with his or her emotions, but also with that of the patient. While caretakers usually enjoy their work, and love taking care of people, particularly loved ones, it can be exhausting and emotionally draining. Also, there is usually very little time left for self-care.

Psychotherapy can help to address family caregiver stress, particularly when the carer feels that he or she lacks support, or has become anxious, overwhelmed, isolated or depressed.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers family therapies to address your family caregiver stress  issues, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

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Anthony Cave

M.A., R.Psych
About me My private practice consists of psychotherapy services for youth, adults and elders. An appointment usually lasts an hour and takes place in a confidential office setting. I also provide clinical consulting... Read more