Brain Injury, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Counsellors

Brain Injury, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Brain injury can cause a many emotional difficulties. It can change the ways in which a person functions emotionally and in the way he or she expresses emotions. There could be a wide range of emotional difficulties, such as difficulty with controlling mood swings.

While some brain injury victims experience a change in emotions right away, others may take months to show changes in the way they behave. Some people with brain injuries will experience quick and intense emotional changes, but they will calm down again quickly. Alternatively, they may experience emotional lability, or severe mood swings.

These behavioural changes are sometimes the result of damage to the emotional center in the brain. There is not always a specific trigger that causes the sudden emotional response in the patient, and that can be very confusing for loved ones. They will often take the blame for the sudden outbursts on themselves, thinking that they did something to upset the patient. In some cases, the person might express emotions they don't feel at all, because they are unable to control the emotions they express.

In most cases, symptoms dissipate in the months following the brain injury, allowing the patient to return to more balanced emotional balance. However, people with brain injury and their families have found hope in working closely with a therapists. A therapists who offers brain injury counselling will help establish the cause of emotional changes and reassure the family and friends, while equipping them with better coping skills. A range of therapies can help improve emotional expression in brain injury patients.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers cognitive behavioural therapy or counselling to address your brain injury issues you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Through the media, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder has become quite well known.
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, or as it's commonly known, OCD is a common anxiety disorder in which a person feels fear, worry, apprehension and other intrusive thoughts. Most people diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder report childhood onset of symptoms, which could lead to a range of ongoing anxiety disorders.

It is common for the person to perform repetitive behaviors that are meant to reduce anxiety. A person can develop a range of compulsions or obsessions. Someone who has Obsessive Compulsive Disorder will repeatedly check on things (such as locking doors, switching off lights, etc.), obsessively wash their hands or clean their homes excessively.

In some cases, a person might become preoccupied with religious, violent or sexual thoughts, or have relationship-based obsession. They may become averse to certain words or numbers and perform nervous rituals, such as performing a certain routine repeatedly.

To other people, a person with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder might seem paranoid. It could cause stress in a relationship or family, and could lead to severe financial or emotional distress. Since most people with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder recognize their behavior as irrational, it can cause them even more distress.

Cognitive Behavioural therapy offers a range of techniques to assist people with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. A specific technique used in OCD is exposure and response prevention (ERP). This technique teaches a person with OCD to gradually learn to tolerate the anxieties caused by not continuing the rituals. Counsellors perform this and other therapies in a safe and non-judgmental environment.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers Obsessive Compulsive Disorder  to help with your repetitive, compulsive behaviour issues you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

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Gerry Bock

M.A., RCC