Brain Injury, Eating Disorders Counsellors

Brain Injury, Eating Disorders

Brain injury can cause a many emotional difficulties. It can change the ways in which a person functions emotionally and in the way he or she expresses emotions. There could be a wide range of emotional difficulties, such as difficulty with controlling mood swings.

While some brain injury victims experience a change in emotions right away, others may take months to show changes in the way they behave. Some people with brain injuries will experience quick and intense emotional changes, but they will calm down again quickly. Alternatively, they may experience emotional lability, or severe mood swings.

These behavioural changes are sometimes the result of damage to the emotional center in the brain. There is not always a specific trigger that causes the sudden emotional response in the patient, and that can be very confusing for loved ones. They will often take the blame for the sudden outbursts on themselves, thinking that they did something to upset the patient. In some cases, the person might express emotions they don't feel at all, because they are unable to control the emotions they express.

In most cases, symptoms dissipate in the months following the brain injury, allowing the patient to return to more balanced emotional balance. However, people with brain injury and their families have found hope in working closely with a therapists. A therapists who offers brain injury counselling will help establish the cause of emotional changes and reassure the family and friends, while equipping them with better coping skills. A range of therapies can help improve emotional expression in brain injury patients.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers cognitive behavioural therapy or counselling to address your brain injury issues you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Eating disorders comprise a range of attitudes and behaviors relating to food and body-image. The three main eating disorders are Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia, and ED NOS (eating disorder not otherwise specified). These conditions manifest to different degrees in different people and can sometimes be mistakenly judged as poor eating habits, or a lack of willpower.

People with eating disorders don't eat in harmony with their bodies' needs, instead, people with Anorexia Nervosa eat much less than they need, while Bulimia sufferers binge and then induce vomiting. They may also do other things to compensate for overeating, including exercising or fasting. ED NOS combines any combination of the other two conditions.

Apart from the physical symptoms and behaviors above, someone with an eating disorder will generally also have poor self-esteem and obsessively research or talk about food, dieting or exercise. Poor body image will cause them to either wear clothes that cover up every inch of their bodies, or flaunt  in order to attract attention. They will find it hard to accept criticism and compliments.

Therapy for eating disorders depend on the patient. While some people respond well to short term outpatient treatment, others respond better to long-term inpatient treatment. Cognitive behavioral therapy and family therapy are long term treatments that have been proven to be effective, while group therapy, psychodynamic psychotherapies and feminist therapies work for people who will respond well to short term therapy.

Family therapy is often advised for children and adolescents who are experiencing eating disorders. Research has also shown dialectical behavioral therapy to be effective.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who addresses eating disorders, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

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