Addictions - Including Substances, LGBTQ Issues Counsellors

Addictions - Including Substances, LGBTQ Issues

While some people can use prescription or recreational drugs with no negative effects, many others become addicted and face dramatic health and lifestyle problems as a result. Substance addictions negatively affect relationships, home, school or work, leaving the person feeling ashamed, helpless and isolated.

Physical symptoms of substance abuse and addiction are varied depending on the drug of choice, but the symptoms of the addiction itself are similar. People who are addicted to substances may neglect their responsibilities, take potentially dangerous risks and get into trouble with the law. As their drug use spirals out of control, they will lose interest in activities that used to be enjoyable and continue to take drugs despite knowing the harm it causes.

Substance addicts tend to build up a tolerance to their drug of choice, and get angry when they can't get more of it. Withdrawal symptoms are highly probable when an addict goes without it for too long. Depression, nausea, insomnia, sweating, restlessness, anxiety and shaking are all common withdrawal symptoms.

Psychotherapy can help you to overcome substance addiction by focusing on correcting maladaptive behaviors. Substance abuse is usually a coping mechanism against emotionally overwhelming past events or memories. Substances are often used to provide instant gratification instead of facing certain issues.

Therapists are equipped to help clients deal with addiction recovery through empowerment and helping them set simple short term targets. The first target is sobriety, followed by empowering the client with adaptive skills and finding new coping strategies that deal with the issues that caused the addiction. Substance addiction can be ended, allowing the person to live a healthy, productive life.

If you need a counsellor or psychologist to help you address the effects of substance addiction, you can search the directory below to find a professional with the approach best suited to your situation.

Counselling for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer individuals makes the transition to living true to yourself easier. While acceptance of GLBTQ people is on the rise, it can still be stressful for some. Speaking to someone about your fears and struggles can make the transition easier.


While GLBTQ people are more easily accepted than years ago, there are still some homophobic elements that discriminate against the movement and people who form part of it.

Despite the strides made in public acceptance by the GLBTQ community, they still face many issues that require psychological or counselling intervention. Depression caused by discrimination is one of the main issues that counselling addresses, as well as religious abuse, homophobic work and living conditions, self-destructive behavior, assault, and family estrangement or rejection.


HIV and AIDS issues are serious concerns faced by gay people who might be in denial and practice unsafe sex. Some people will develop anxiety about being tested, and coping with results, while others might face the trauma of caring for a loved one with AIDS.

In the past, GLBTQ counselling was not as freely available as it is today, but the demand has risen as the community realised that it offers a safe and non-judgmental environment for people to get help. Today, counselling helps thousands of people to live freely and healthily without a fear of judgment, through specific support services and counselling that helps Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer people as well as their friends and families to live harmoniously.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who works with the GLBTQ commuity you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Paul Brennan

M.C., R.Psych
    • Online booking
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