Sleep Difficulties-Adults, Hoarding Counsellors - German Language

Sleep Difficulties-Adults, Hoarding

Sleep difficulties in adults can occur for a great number of reasons, both common and unusual.  For most people, sleep is a routine, but many people experience sleep difficulties, such as insomnia on a fairly regular basis. While it usually clears us in a short while, it can become a long-term problem, because sleep is important for our bodies and minds to stay healthy.

Sleep difficulties can, after a few weeks, cause a person to feel tired all the time, and cause them to nod off during the day. Difficulty concentrating, making decisions and feeling depressed are some of the symptoms of sleep difficulties. People who perform jobs that require a lot of concentration, such as operating heavy machinery or driving, can pose a danger to themselves and others if they suffer from sleep difficulties. Over time, sleep difficulties can lead to high blood pressure, overweight and diabetes.

Many situations can contribute to sleep difficulties, including too much noise or  light in the bedroom, a bed that is too small or uncomfortable, or a partner with a different sleep pattern. Lifestyle choices such as smoking, going to bed too late, lack of exercise, consuming caffeine, no set bedtime routine, and illness can also cause insomnia.

A therapist can help you deal with sleep difficulties, by using progressive muscle relaxation therapy, sleep restriction and cognitive therapy.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers sleep disorders counselling to address sleep difficulties you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Hoarding is a persistent difficulty discarding or letting go of possessions. The behaviour often has a number of negative effects for the hoarder and often for family members.  These can include emotional, social and physical challenges for the hoarder and those in a relationship with the hoarder.

There is a difference between hoarding and collecting.  Hoarding often produces a sense of shame as many of the items are not longer needed and their presence often affects day to day functioning.  Collecting may be a source of pride because the items are intentionally collected, valued and organized.

If you feel you have a problem with hoarding it may be useful to get help to challenge it and discover what will work to address it and the issues that trigger it.

Eric Ochs

Ph.D., R.Psych
Dr. Eric Ochs was awarded his doctoral degree in clinical psychology from McGill University in 2000. He was trained and worked for a number of years at the Royal Victoria Hospital (Montreal) in the Sex & Couple... Read more