Eating Disorders, Women's Issues Shame Counselling & Therapy

Eating Disorders, Women's Issues

Eating disorders comprise a range of attitudes and behaviors relating to food and body-image. The three main eating disorders are Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia, and ED NOS (eating disorder not otherwise specified). These conditions manifest to different degrees in different people and can sometimes be mistakenly judged as poor eating habits, or a lack of willpower.

People with eating disorders don't eat in harmony with their bodies' needs, instead, people with Anorexia Nervosa eat much less than they need, while Bulimia sufferers binge and then induce vomiting. They may also do other things to compensate for overeating, including exercising or fasting. ED NOS combines any combination of the other two conditions.

Apart from the physical symptoms and behaviors above, someone with an eating disorder will generally also have poor self-esteem and obsessively research or talk about food, dieting or exercise. Poor body image will cause them to either wear clothes that cover up every inch of their bodies, or flaunt  in order to attract attention. They will find it hard to accept criticism and compliments.

Therapy for eating disorders depend on the patient. While some people respond well to short term outpatient treatment, others respond better to long-term inpatient treatment. Cognitive behavioral therapy and family therapy are long term treatments that have been proven to be effective, while group therapy, psychodynamic psychotherapies and feminist therapies work for people who will respond well to short term therapy.

Family therapy is often advised for children and adolescents who are experiencing eating disorders. Research has also shown dialectical behavioral therapy to be effective.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who addresses eating disorders, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Women are complex, and often their need to feel heard and understood is not met in society. In this world, women are required to listen and to care, when they are often the ones who need nurturing, too.  Therefore, talk therapy has been found to be extremely beneficial in dealing with women's issues.

Talking can help a woman to better understand the feelings, thoughts and beliefs that manifest in certain unwanted behaviors. It can help pave the way to empowerment in terms of decisions and self-acceptance, two elements that can improve relationships and life in general. Working through these issues is essential because it determines a woman's experience of life and the people around her.

Women's issues are often at play when someone has experienced abuse (physical, emotional or sexual), relationship problems, physical conditions, family problems, or loss. Those issues can make anyone feel lonely or isolated, depressed, lacking confidence, anxious or stressed.

Talk therapy includes one-on-one consultations that will help you to learn to set clear boundaries, gain assertiveness and build self esteem in order to gain more control. In cases that involve other family members, group sessions will help to redefine relationships, improve communication and resolve resentment and anger issues. Businesswomen can benefit from women's issues counselling by learning how to develop themselves and to achieve work-life balance.

Counsellors and psychologists who deal with women's issues provide a safe and confidential environment in which you can express yourself, process your emotions and restructure your thoughts, while learning how to assert yourself as a woman in today's fast-paced world.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers talk therapy or counselling to address your women's issues you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Shame Counselling & Therapy

There are a variety of approaches to address the issue of shame.  One of them is the Shame Resilience method is based on the research of Bren√© Brown, Ph.D. LMSW. 

Shame Resilience is the developed ability to practice authenticity when we experience shame, to move through the experience without sacrificing our values, and to come out on the other side of the shame experience with more courage, compassion, and connection than we had going into it.

Shame Resilience is about moving from shame to empathy- the real antidote to shame. Self-compassion is also critically important, because when we’re able to be tender with ourselves in the midst of shame we’re more likely to reach out, connect and experience empathy.

Other approaches, like Complex Integration of Multiple Brain Systems (CIMBS)  uses what is called a systems perspective that can address how an individual has learned to respond due to early trauma and or other developmental experiences.

Approaches to shame are not limited to the above.  There are many other therapies that address feeling.

If you do contact a therapist regarding shame issues please make sure that you ask them about their training in this area and choose a therapist whose approach makes sense to you.

 

Karen Goble

M.A., RCC
I’m a psychotherapist (MA, RCC) who offers therapy with heart. I’m committed to helping my clients learn how to move courageously beyond shame and self-defeat, and towards wholeheartedness, vulnerability,... Read more