Brain Injury, Grief and Loss - General Self Regulation Therapy (SRT)

Brain Injury, Grief and Loss - General

Brain injury can cause a many emotional difficulties. It can change the ways in which a person functions emotionally and in the way he or she expresses emotions. There could be a wide range of emotional difficulties, such as difficulty with controlling mood swings.

While some brain injury victims experience a change in emotions right away, others may take months to show changes in the way they behave. Some people with brain injuries will experience quick and intense emotional changes, but they will calm down again quickly. Alternatively, they may experience emotional lability, or severe mood swings.

These behavioural changes are sometimes the result of damage to the emotional center in the brain. There is not always a specific trigger that causes the sudden emotional response in the patient, and that can be very confusing for loved ones. They will often take the blame for the sudden outbursts on themselves, thinking that they did something to upset the patient. In some cases, the person might express emotions they don't feel at all, because they are unable to control the emotions they express.

In most cases, symptoms dissipate in the months following the brain injury, allowing the patient to return to more balanced emotional balance. However, people with brain injury and their families have found hope in working closely with a therapists. A therapists who offers brain injury counselling will help establish the cause of emotional changes and reassure the family and friends, while equipping them with better coping skills. A range of therapies can help improve emotional expression in brain injury patients.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers cognitive behavioural therapy or counselling to address your brain injury issues you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Grief is a natural part of dealing with the loss of a loved one, or a situation, or a way in which we see ourselves. Loss requires that we change the way things used to be and find a new way to restructure our lives accordingly. It's common for people to fear change, particularly if a part of us, or a person we loved deeply, is no longer there. It leaves a gap that has to be filled, but nothing can replace the person who has left us behind.

People deal with loss in many different ways, but the desired end result is the same - trying to piece together the puzzle to the best of our ability, without the missing piece. We also go through the various stages of grief at varying speeds and intensities. Dealing with all the emotions that form part of grief is what makes support so very important.

Time is of the essence during the grieving period, and something we sometimes tend to rush. That's why it's so useful to speak to a therapist who does grief counselling during this time.

A therapist will help you understand that what you are feeling is completely normal and even expected. Medical professionals are aware of the wide range of natural responses to grief and loss and are generally reluctant to diagnose mental illness while a person is in a period of bereavement. However, if depression is present, medication is likely to be prescribed.

Grief therapy will help you to accept the loss and be able to talk about it without breaking down. You will learn to identify and express your emotions regarding the loss and learn to make decisions without your loved one.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist does grief counselling to address your grief and loss you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Self Regulation Therapy (SRT)

Self Regulation Therapy (SRT) offers a mind-body approach to reducing excess nervous activation. With roots in neurobiology, SRT reflects the human's built-in automatic response to threat or novelty.

The nervous system changes as the result of negative events, but Self Regulation Therapy (SRT) helps the nervous system to integrate these events and balance the nervous system.

Self Regulation Therapy (SRT) takes place in a contained environment where the client feels safe. It helps to develop new neural pathways to help the client to develop flexibility and to better handle daily stresses and challenges.

Self Regulation Therapy (SRT) can help the symptoms of dysregulation, including mood disorders, personality disorders, PTSD, stress and anxiety disorders, and physical issues such as chronic pain, asthma, migraines and insomnia.

If you are looking for a therapist who offers Self Regulation Therapy (SRT), please browse our list of practitioners below..

Graham Butler

M.C., RCC
    • Online booking
I work with people who are facing difficult challenges. They feel stuck. They want to change the way they feel but don’t know how. No matter the nature of these problems, they prevent these people from living the... Read more