Life Transitions, Postpartum Depression Psycho-Educational Groups

Life Transitions, Postpartum Depression

Life transitions can be rewarding, but that doesn't mean they are necessarily easy. Change usually comes with mixed emotions, challenges and stress. It's natural to feel anxious, confused, unsettled and fatigued, no matter how you have looked forward to a change. While promotions at work can be positive and exciting, there are also negative transitions that could make you feel hopeless and negative, anxious and unable to see the solutions to the inevitable problems you face.


Some of the common transitions that people face include moving house, divorce, remarriage, empty nest syndrome, concerns about aging, adjusting to a new job, illness, or death of a loved one.

During periods of transitions, it's common for emotions from some of your past experiences to be triggered, which can make the current situation feel so much worse. That's when confusion takes over, leaving you feeling out of control and confused.

Transition counselling can help you deal with your life changes and the emotions that you are feeling in a safe and effective manner. You will be able to find the root causes of your reactions and you will be able to face the changes head on. You may even be able to push past your self-imposed limits to broaden your horizons and find a strong, new you.

You will gain clarity and understanding, as well as self-confidence to help you feel more grounded and you will develop a sense of purpose in your life. Transition therapy  has helped hundreds of thousands of people to come to terms with difficult issues in life and you can too.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who addresses transitions, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Postpartum depression affects nearly a quarter of all new mothers. Pregnant women who feel sad, blue or down, are at an ever greater risk of postpartum depression. Women who are taking anti-depressants before, will have to stop when they fall pregnant, causing increased feelings of depression.

It is common for new mothers to be afraid to discuss postpartum depression and their thoughts and feelings for fear of being judged as bad mothers. Unless these emotions are discussed with a professional, it could escalate to worse problems.

The most common symptoms of baby blues include anger, sadness, numbness, loss of appetite, trouble sleeping and mood swings. However, postpartum depression affects your functioning significantly and symptoms could include too much or too little sleep, lack of motivation and energy, restlessness and mood swings, trouble with decision making, lots of crying, feelings of worthlessness, and memory problems. Feelings of worthlessness may cause you to withdraw from family and friends. Aches, pains and stomach problems may persist, making it hard to take care of a baby. A new mother with postpartum depression may lose interest in activities she used to enjoy.

The dangers of postpartum depression includes thoughts of the mother hurting herself or her baby, or a total lack of interest in the baby. Some mothers are unable to care for themselves or for their babies.

Professional help is essential for women suffering from postpartum depression to change their perceptions about themselves. A therapist will help a new mother adjust to the changes brought about by motherhood and the changes in hormones and lifestyle and the dynamics of being responsible for a new life.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers postpartum depression counselling and other women's issues you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Psycho-Educational Groups

Psychoeducational Groups bring together different people who are experiencing similar  issues, to share the therapeutic experience. Whether the therapy is for interpersonal relationships or shared issues, Psychoeducational Groups can help clients reach a variety of therapeutic outcomes.

During Psychoeducational Groups therapy, participants will discuss their issues with other parents who have similar issues. The group setting provides a supportive environment, and a sense of belonging.  

Psychoeducational Groups provides participants with information and resources on specific topics. The groups are structured and provide specific modules or topics for discussion, with the intention to provide support for parents who are experiencing the same issues.

If you are looking for a therapist who offers Psycho-Educational Groups, please browse our list of practitioners below..

Note: You may narrow your search by selecting more than one filter below.

Ishtar Beck

M.A., RCC
    • Video on profile
    • Online booking
Welcome to Counselling Home, located in East Van on the Drive. Here you will find a safe space in which to heal and grow as an individual and in your relationships. Here you will be listened to and understood. You will... Read more