Chronic Pain Observed Experiential Integration (OEI)

Chronic Pain

Chronic pain brings hundreds of people to therapy every week. Many physical and psychological issues can cause chronic pain and it is important to rule out any medical causes and get treatment by speaking to a physician.

Some people experience chronic pain as the result of untreated emotional overwhelm, unexpressed anger, depression or grief. Symptoms of chronic pain typically include headaches; muscle tension, pain or fatigue;  shooting nerve pains, and tension in the back, neck and shoulders.

Many people with chronic pain disorder are reluctant to explore the emotional causes of their pain for fear of being told that they are inventing the symptoms. However, true somaticizing is a very real condition in which the emotions are unable to leave the body.

Another reason why people are loathe to admit the emotional roots of their pain, is that they fear that there would be no medical cure. Chronic pain with an emotional root requires that they confront the emotions that have been hidden away, and this can be challenging.

Therapists and psychologists who do  chronic pain therapy offer a confidential and safe environment in which people can explore pent-up emotions and as a result experience short term and long term relief. Symptoms caused by long term emotional build-up may require long-term treatment and due to the physical changes, some medical intervention and active physiotherapy is often very important as well.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who works with chronic pain you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Observed Experiential Integration (OEI)

Observed Experiential Integration (OEI) is an effective therapy for people who have experienced trauma, or who have negative thoughts and beliefs to eradicate. It is one of the quicker therapies for this type of issue.

Observed Experiential Integration (OEI) has evolved out of EMDR integrates the visual pathways and both of the brain hemispheres to reduce anxiety and trauma.

During therapy, the client covers or uncovers a single eye at a time, while following the therapist's moving fingers with their eyes. This exercise integrates the two brain hemispheres to allow information to easily travel through the sensory processors and emotional processors.

If you are looking for a therapist who offers Observed Experiential Integration (OEI), please browse our list of practitioners below..

Ashley Shankar

M.S.W., RSW
I’m a cis South Asian woman. My Masters in Social Work from the University of British Columbia has granted me the opportunity to work extensively in diverse community mental health settings. I work with... Read more