Eating Disorders, Postpartum Depression Meditation

Eating Disorders, Postpartum Depression

Eating disorders comprise a range of attitudes and behaviors relating to food and body-image. The three main eating disorders are Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia, and ED NOS (eating disorder not otherwise specified). These conditions manifest to different degrees in different people and can sometimes be mistakenly judged as poor eating habits, or a lack of willpower.

People with eating disorders don't eat in harmony with their bodies' needs, instead, people with Anorexia Nervosa eat much less than they need, while Bulimia sufferers binge and then induce vomiting. They may also do other things to compensate for overeating, including exercising or fasting. ED NOS combines any combination of the other two conditions.

Apart from the physical symptoms and behaviors above, someone with an eating disorder will generally also have poor self-esteem and obsessively research or talk about food, dieting or exercise. Poor body image will cause them to either wear clothes that cover up every inch of their bodies, or flaunt  in order to attract attention. They will find it hard to accept criticism and compliments.

Therapy for eating disorders depend on the patient. While some people respond well to short term outpatient treatment, others respond better to long-term inpatient treatment. Cognitive behavioral therapy and family therapy are long term treatments that have been proven to be effective, while group therapy, psychodynamic psychotherapies and feminist therapies work for people who will respond well to short term therapy.

Family therapy is often advised for children and adolescents who are experiencing eating disorders. Research has also shown dialectical behavioral therapy to be effective.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who addresses eating disorders, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Postpartum depression affects nearly a quarter of all new mothers. Pregnant women who feel sad, blue or down, are at an ever greater risk of postpartum depression. Women who are taking anti-depressants before, will have to stop when they fall pregnant, causing increased feelings of depression.

It is common for new mothers to be afraid to discuss postpartum depression and their thoughts and feelings for fear of being judged as bad mothers. Unless these emotions are discussed with a professional, it could escalate to worse problems.

The most common symptoms of baby blues include anger, sadness, numbness, loss of appetite, trouble sleeping and mood swings. However, postpartum depression affects your functioning significantly and symptoms could include too much or too little sleep, lack of motivation and energy, restlessness and mood swings, trouble with decision making, lots of crying, feelings of worthlessness, and memory problems. Feelings of worthlessness may cause you to withdraw from family and friends. Aches, pains and stomach problems may persist, making it hard to take care of a baby. A new mother with postpartum depression may lose interest in activities she used to enjoy.

The dangers of postpartum depression includes thoughts of the mother hurting herself or her baby, or a total lack of interest in the baby. Some mothers are unable to care for themselves or for their babies.

Professional help is essential for women suffering from postpartum depression to change their perceptions about themselves. A therapist will help a new mother adjust to the changes brought about by motherhood and the changes in hormones and lifestyle and the dynamics of being responsible for a new life.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers postpartum depression counselling and other women's issues you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Meditation

Meditation is a calming practice that helps the mind to be focused in the now. When the mind is in a meditative state, it is uncluttered and free from memories, worries and concerns.

People have practiced meditation for many centuries and continue to do so because of its healing powers, particularly for managing stress and easing pain.

There are hundreds of approaches that can all help people to increase their sense of calmness, and develop a tranquil mind.

Meditation offers a range of health benefits that result from the calmness and breathing which slows down the heart rate. Meditation can help treat high blood pressure, chronic pain and substance abuse, to name but a few.

If you are looking for a therapist who offers Meditation, please browse our list of practitioners below..

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Megan Sutherland

M.S.W., RCSW
Warm, accepting, inclusive and practical best describes my personal therapeutic style. I also place a high value on careful listening, empathy, professional ethics and accountability.  I believe that all people... Read more