Postpartum Depression Jungian Psychotherapy

Postpartum Depression

Postpartum depression affects nearly a quarter of all new mothers. Pregnant women who feel sad, blue or down, are at an ever greater risk of postpartum depression. Women who are taking anti-depressants before, will have to stop when they fall pregnant, causing increased feelings of depression.

It is common for new mothers to be afraid to discuss postpartum depression and their thoughts and feelings for fear of being judged as bad mothers. Unless these emotions are discussed with a professional, it could escalate to worse problems.

The most common symptoms of baby blues include anger, sadness, numbness, loss of appetite, trouble sleeping and mood swings. However, postpartum depression affects your functioning significantly and symptoms could include too much or too little sleep, lack of motivation and energy, restlessness and mood swings, trouble with decision making, lots of crying, feelings of worthlessness, and memory problems. Feelings of worthlessness may cause you to withdraw from family and friends. Aches, pains and stomach problems may persist, making it hard to take care of a baby. A new mother with postpartum depression may lose interest in activities she used to enjoy.

The dangers of postpartum depression includes thoughts of the mother hurting herself or her baby, or a total lack of interest in the baby. Some mothers are unable to care for themselves or for their babies.

Professional help is essential for women suffering from postpartum depression to change their perceptions about themselves. A therapist will help a new mother adjust to the changes brought about by motherhood and the changes in hormones and lifestyle and the dynamics of being responsible for a new life.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers postpartum depression counselling and other women's issues you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Jungian Psychotherapy

Jungian Psychotherapy, named after Carl Jung is essentially analytical psychology. Jung believed that the unconscious was a collective state that was shared by everyone. He also believed that everyone desires to experience wholeness, through creating harmony by the unconsciousness and the consciousness. Jung aimed to accomplish this harmony through dream study.

Depth psychology analyses the unconscious and is also known as Jungian psychotherapy or analysis. Dreams play an important role in Jungian psychotherapy.

Jung believed that dreams are usually attitude-compensations and that dreams can offer wisdom, constructive criticism, advice and ego information. Jungian psychotherapy aims to establish a relationship between the unconscious and the ego in order to bring about a psyche transformation.

If you are looking for a therapist who offers Jungian Psychotherapy, please browse our list of practitioners below..

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Mary Smyth

M.Sc., CCC
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Agata Burdziuk

M.A., RCC