Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Jungian Psychotherapy

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is an anxiety disorder that usually starts within the three months of a traumatic incident. It has been reported that in rare cases, PTSD symptoms may only occur after a number of years.

Three groups of symptoms are present in people with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Increased anxiety / emotional arousal includes anger or irritability, overwhelming shame or guilt, sleeplessness and self-destructive behaviour. The second group of symptoms, known as intrusive memories, causes flashbacks to the traumatic event and upsetting dreams. The third group of symptoms that a Post Traumatic Stress Disorder patient may experience, includes emotional numbing or avoidance. This group of symptoms includes memory problems, poor concentration, feeling emotionally numb, a sense of hopelessness, and an avoidance of activities that the person used to find enjoyable.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder symptoms may be present for a while, disappear and then return again. General stress may increase the symptoms, as can reminders of the traumatic incident.

Therapists who address  Post Traumatic Stress Disorder generally use one, or a combination of trauma therapies to treat it. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is commonly used and can help a person to change their reactions to traumatic memories.

Exposure therapy can help a person reduce the amount of fear related to the feelings and thoughts associated with past traumatic events. Cognitive therapy helps a person to change the way he or she thinks about the event and the aftermath of a traumatic incident. It will help a person to identify thoughts that cause fear and anger, and learn ways to replace those thoughts with less stressful and more empowering thoughts.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and related issues you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Jungian Psychotherapy, Existential-Humanistic

Jungian Psychotherapy, named after Carl Jung is essentially analytical psychology. Jung believed that the unconscious was a collective state that was shared by everyone. He also believed that everyone desires to experience wholeness, through creating harmony by the unconsciousness and the consciousness. Jung aimed to accomplish this harmony through dream study.

Depth psychology analyses the unconscious and is also known as Jungian psychotherapy or analysis. Dreams play an important role in Jungian psychotherapy.

Jung believed that dreams are usually attitude-compensations and that dreams can offer wisdom, constructive criticism, advice and ego information. Jungian psychotherapy aims to establish a relationship between the unconscious and the ego in order to bring about a psyche transformation.

If you are looking for a therapist who offers Jungian Psychotherapy, please browse our list of practitioners below..

Existential-Humanistic psychotherapies emphasize a collaborative approach to the understanding of the client's full experience rather than just the symptom, thoughts or behaviour. Psychological problems are viewed as the result of a restricted ability to make authentic, meaningful, and self-directed choices about how to live. Consequently, interventions are aimed at increasing client self-awareness and self-understanding. The key words for existential-humanistic therapy are acceptance and growth, responsibility and freedom.

Geoff Thompson

Ph.D., CCC
Geoff has demonstrated an exemplary ability to connect with clients while working with the Sunshine Coast Health Centre. An extensive background in both residential and outpatient addiction treatment has helped Geoff... Read more