Grief and Loss - General, Perfectionism Dialectical Behaviour Therapy

Grief and Loss - General, Perfectionism

Grief is a natural part of dealing with the loss of a loved one, or a situation, or a way in which we see ourselves. Loss requires that we change the way things used to be and find a new way to restructure our lives accordingly. It's common for people to fear change, particularly if a part of us, or a person we loved deeply, is no longer there. It leaves a gap that has to be filled, but nothing can replace the person who has left us behind.

People deal with loss in many different ways, but the desired end result is the same - trying to piece together the puzzle to the best of our ability, without the missing piece. We also go through the various stages of grief at varying speeds and intensities. Dealing with all the emotions that form part of grief is what makes support so very important.

Time is of the essence during the grieving period, and something we sometimes tend to rush. That's why it's so useful to speak to a therapist who does grief counselling during this time.

A therapist will help you understand that what you are feeling is completely normal and even expected. Medical professionals are aware of the wide range of natural responses to grief and loss and are generally reluctant to diagnose mental illness while a person is in a period of bereavement. However, if depression is present, medication is likely to be prescribed.

Grief therapy will help you to accept the loss and be able to talk about it without breaking down. You will learn to identify and express your emotions regarding the loss and learn to make decisions without your loved one.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist does grief counselling to address your grief and loss you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Perfectionism is considered as a personality trait among many mental health practitioners.  Perfectionists tend to view projects or tasks that are not perfect done, as unworthy. Unless they know that they can do something perfectly, they are unlikely to take it on. They tend not to care much about the learning process while completing a task, but rather about the end project, which, for them, is the most important aspect of any project they undertake.

Procrastination is a great obstacle with people who are perfectionists. They usually don't want to start a task until they are sure that they can do it perfectly. It's common for them to spend an enormous amount of time on a project, making sure that it is done to perfection. Yet, perfectionism prevents these people from appreciating a job well done. Instead, they don't believe that anything they do is good enough and they constantly compare their results with that of other people. They become fixated on achieving perfection.

There is a correlation between perfectionism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and some perfectionists also have OCD.  However, not all people with OCD are perfectionists. While most people with an ambition to succeed and therefore strive to excel in their pursuits, they are not necessarily perfectionists.

Therapy can be very helpful in treating perfectionism. Therapy will help the individual to reframe their thinking to change the end goal of his or her undertakings. A therapist may often help perfectionists recognize that some of the most successful people are not perfectionists at all.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers therapies to address your perfectionism or OCD issues, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Dialectical Behaviour Therapy

Dialectical Behaviour Therapy is helpful in helping clients who suffer from a wide range of mental health issues. It is most commonly used for people that are having problems managing their emotions. It typically includes individual and group sessions with focus on skill learning of attention, managing emotions and interpersonal skills.

Dialectical Behaviour Therapy helps individuals to cope with stressful situations and distressing emotions to help improve their interpersonal relationships. During times of stress, a person usually acts automatically with no regard for consequences, and this often leads to self-destructive behaviours such as self-harm, manipulation and poor eating and sleeping habits. Dialectical Behaviour Therapy can help a client to make better decisions.

During sessions, the therapist will discuss different viewpoints, because they share the theory that opposites can, and do, co-exist. The therapist will teach the client helpful skills that will help the client to accept or change a situation.

If you are looking for a therapist who offers Dialectical Behaviour Therapy, please browse our list of practitioners below..

Karen Ergas

Ph.D., R.Psych
Dr. Karen Ergas is a registered clinical psychologist with over 20 years experience working with individuals who have eating disorders. She worked at St. Paul's Hospital Eating Disorders Program from 1994-2011.... Read more