Eating Disorders, LGBTQ Issues Developmental Needs Meeting Therapy

Eating Disorders, LGBTQ Issues

Eating disorders comprise a range of attitudes and behaviors relating to food and body-image. The three main eating disorders are Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia, and ED NOS (eating disorder not otherwise specified). These conditions manifest to different degrees in different people and can sometimes be mistakenly judged as poor eating habits, or a lack of willpower.

People with eating disorders don't eat in harmony with their bodies' needs, instead, people with Anorexia Nervosa eat much less than they need, while Bulimia sufferers binge and then induce vomiting. They may also do other things to compensate for overeating, including exercising or fasting. ED NOS combines any combination of the other two conditions.

Apart from the physical symptoms and behaviors above, someone with an eating disorder will generally also have poor self-esteem and obsessively research or talk about food, dieting or exercise. Poor body image will cause them to either wear clothes that cover up every inch of their bodies, or flaunt  in order to attract attention. They will find it hard to accept criticism and compliments.

Therapy for eating disorders depend on the patient. While some people respond well to short term outpatient treatment, others respond better to long-term inpatient treatment. Cognitive behavioral therapy and family therapy are long term treatments that have been proven to be effective, while group therapy, psychodynamic psychotherapies and feminist therapies work for people who will respond well to short term therapy.

Family therapy is often advised for children and adolescents who are experiencing eating disorders. Research has also shown dialectical behavioral therapy to be effective.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who addresses eating disorders, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Counselling for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer individuals makes the transition to living true to yourself easier. While acceptance of GLBTQ people is on the rise, it can still be stressful for some. Speaking to someone about your fears and struggles can make the transition easier.


While GLBTQ people are more easily accepted than years ago, there are still some homophobic elements that discriminate against the movement and people who form part of it.

Despite the strides made in public acceptance by the GLBTQ community, they still face many issues that require psychological or counselling intervention. Depression caused by discrimination is one of the main issues that counselling addresses, as well as religious abuse, homophobic work and living conditions, self-destructive behavior, assault, and family estrangement or rejection.


HIV and AIDS issues are serious concerns faced by gay people who might be in denial and practice unsafe sex. Some people will develop anxiety about being tested, and coping with results, while others might face the trauma of caring for a loved one with AIDS.

In the past, GLBTQ counselling was not as freely available as it is today, but the demand has risen as the community realised that it offers a safe and non-judgmental environment for people to get help. Today, counselling helps thousands of people to live freely and healthily without a fear of judgment, through specific support services and counselling that helps Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer people as well as their friends and families to live harmoniously.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who works with the GLBTQ commuity you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Developmental Needs Meeting Therapy, Mindfulness approaches

DNMS therapists believe that when certain needs are not met during childhood, a client will maintain a childlike state specific to that inadequacy into adulthood.

Sexual, verbal or physical abuse, as well as traumatic experiences, attachment issues and rejection can all result in a range of issues which can be addressed through Developmental Needs Meeting Therapy.

In the earlier stages of therapy, therapists will help clients to connect to their own inner resources, including a protective, nurturing and spiritual self. When these resources are integrated, the client will discover how to heal the child states within them. As a result of this emotional healing, a client will experience more positive behaviours and emotions through healing the wounded child-egos within.

If you are looking for a therapist who offers Developmental Needs Meeting Therapy, please browse our list of practitioners below..

Mindfulness approaches help clients to be focused in the here and now. Generally rooted in Eastern meditative techniques,  Mindfulness approaches offer a non-judgmental alternative therapy for dealing with stress and other psychological issues.

By observing worrisome thoughts and learning to accept situations for what they are, people can learn to cope with issues better and make more productive choices.

Mindfulness approaches include a range of models, including dialectical behaviour therapy,  mindfulness-based stress reduction, and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy. These approaches can be used in a wide range of settings to reduce the symptoms of a broad spectrum of psychological issues.  These therapies can be practiced effectively in individual or group therapy.

If you are looking for a therapist who offers Mindfulness approaches, please browse our list of practitioners below..

Note: You may narrow your search by selecting more than one filter below.

Stephanie Pugsley

M.A., RCC
I have over 20 years experience of working with individuals, couples, families and groups in private practice, the Health Service, the Social Services and voluntary organisations.  I am a registered Clinical... Read more