Eating Disorders, Perfectionism Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

Eating Disorders, Perfectionism

Eating disorders comprise a range of attitudes and behaviors relating to food and body-image. The three main eating disorders are Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia, and ED NOS (eating disorder not otherwise specified). These conditions manifest to different degrees in different people and can sometimes be mistakenly judged as poor eating habits, or a lack of willpower.

People with eating disorders don't eat in harmony with their bodies' needs, instead, people with Anorexia Nervosa eat much less than they need, while Bulimia sufferers binge and then induce vomiting. They may also do other things to compensate for overeating, including exercising or fasting. ED NOS combines any combination of the other two conditions.

Apart from the physical symptoms and behaviors above, someone with an eating disorder will generally also have poor self-esteem and obsessively research or talk about food, dieting or exercise. Poor body image will cause them to either wear clothes that cover up every inch of their bodies, or flaunt  in order to attract attention. They will find it hard to accept criticism and compliments.

Therapy for eating disorders depend on the patient. While some people respond well to short term outpatient treatment, others respond better to long-term inpatient treatment. Cognitive behavioral therapy and family therapy are long term treatments that have been proven to be effective, while group therapy, psychodynamic psychotherapies and feminist therapies work for people who will respond well to short term therapy.

Family therapy is often advised for children and adolescents who are experiencing eating disorders. Research has also shown dialectical behavioral therapy to be effective.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who addresses eating disorders, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Perfectionism is considered as a personality trait among many mental health practitioners.  Perfectionists tend to view projects or tasks that are not perfect done, as unworthy. Unless they know that they can do something perfectly, they are unlikely to take it on. They tend not to care much about the learning process while completing a task, but rather about the end project, which, for them, is the most important aspect of any project they undertake.

Procrastination is a great obstacle with people who are perfectionists. They usually don't want to start a task until they are sure that they can do it perfectly. It's common for them to spend an enormous amount of time on a project, making sure that it is done to perfection. Yet, perfectionism prevents these people from appreciating a job well done. Instead, they don't believe that anything they do is good enough and they constantly compare their results with that of other people. They become fixated on achieving perfection.

There is a correlation between perfectionism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and some perfectionists also have OCD.  However, not all people with OCD are perfectionists. While most people with an ambition to succeed and therefore strive to excel in their pursuits, they are not necessarily perfectionists.

Therapy can be very helpful in treating perfectionism. Therapy will help the individual to reframe their thinking to change the end goal of his or her undertakings. A therapist may often help perfectionists recognize that some of the most successful people are not perfectionists at all.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers therapies to address your perfectionism or OCD issues, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is a psychological approach that deals with the way in which clients think about themselves, other people and the world. The outside world affects how we think and feel about ourselves and as a result, our behaviour. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy can help a person to change the way they think about thoughts and feelings, but it is not like other types of talk therapy.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy focuses on current issues and challenges that affect the client right now. It doesn't consider the past issues that caused distress, but rather looks for solutions that can improve the client's state of mind in the moment. Much of CBT involves looking at thought distortions that can affect mood and are affected by mood, and helps client examine and challenge distorted thinking patters.

CBT can help a range of problems, from OCD, PTSD, bulimia, stress, phobias and other issues that might seem overwhelming to the client, by breaking them down into smaller, more manageable chunks.

If you are looking for a therapist who offers Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, please browse our list of practitioners below..

Note: You may narrow your search by selecting more than one filter below.

Kristen Dowling

Ph.D., R.Psych
  NOT CURRENTLY ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS.  I am a Registered Psychologist with the College of Psychologists of BC. I use the effective and evidence-based method of Cognitive Behavioural ... Read more

Karen Ergas

Ph.D., R.Psych
Dr. Karen Ergas is a registered clinical psychologist with over 20 years experience working with individuals who have eating disorders. She worked at St. Paul's Hospital Eating Disorders Program from 1994-2011.... Read more