Career Issues, Eating Disorders Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

Career Issues, Eating Disorders

If you are facing a career transition and feeling overwhelmed, don't think you are alone. Choosing a career, whether it's your first time around, or whether you've been working for twenty years, is not easy. However, thousands of people do that every year with the help of therapists who address career issues.  


During tough economic times, it's even more difficult to settle on a career. Your dream career may not be the financially sound option.

If you question your career, it is time to see a good counsellor t who does career counselling. Your career counsellor will help you find the answers to these questions, and more:

 

  • Do I see my work as a job, or a career?

  • Do I enjoy the activities that I perform on a daily basis?

  • Does my career align with my personal values?

  • Am I playing to my strengths?

  • Do I have the qualifications to pursue my dream career?

  • Do I perform better alone, or in a group environment?

  • Am I able to delegate?

  • Do I have management skills?
     

Other career issues that may affect you psychologically could include sexual harassment, retrenchment, or discrimination in the workplace.


A therapist will help you deal with career issues using cognitive behavioural therapy to address limiting beliefs and attitudes, and find a career in which you can thrive. He or she can also help you to identify resources and develop skills to help you achieve your career objectives. The therapist will also help you to develop coping skills during career transitions, or when dealing with difficult career issues.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who addresses career issues you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Eating disorders comprise a range of attitudes and behaviors relating to food and body-image. The three main eating disorders are Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia, and ED NOS (eating disorder not otherwise specified). These conditions manifest to different degrees in different people and can sometimes be mistakenly judged as poor eating habits, or a lack of willpower.

People with eating disorders don't eat in harmony with their bodies' needs, instead, people with Anorexia Nervosa eat much less than they need, while Bulimia sufferers binge and then induce vomiting. They may also do other things to compensate for overeating, including exercising or fasting. ED NOS combines any combination of the other two conditions.

Apart from the physical symptoms and behaviors above, someone with an eating disorder will generally also have poor self-esteem and obsessively research or talk about food, dieting or exercise. Poor body image will cause them to either wear clothes that cover up every inch of their bodies, or flaunt  in order to attract attention. They will find it hard to accept criticism and compliments.

Therapy for eating disorders depend on the patient. While some people respond well to short term outpatient treatment, others respond better to long-term inpatient treatment. Cognitive behavioral therapy and family therapy are long term treatments that have been proven to be effective, while group therapy, psychodynamic psychotherapies and feminist therapies work for people who will respond well to short term therapy.

Family therapy is often advised for children and adolescents who are experiencing eating disorders. Research has also shown dialectical behavioral therapy to be effective.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who addresses eating disorders, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is a psychological approach that deals with the way in which clients think about themselves, other people and the world. The outside world affects how we think and feel about ourselves and as a result, our behaviour. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy can help a person to change the way they think about thoughts and feelings, but it is not like other types of talk therapy.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy focuses on current issues and challenges that affect the client right now. It doesn't consider the past issues that caused distress, but rather looks for solutions that can improve the client's state of mind in the moment. Much of CBT involves looking at thought distortions that can affect mood and are affected by mood, and helps client examine and challenge distorted thinking patters.

CBT can help a range of problems, from OCD, PTSD, bulimia, stress, phobias and other issues that might seem overwhelming to the client, by breaking them down into smaller, more manageable chunks.

If you are looking for a therapist who offers Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, please browse our list of practitioners below..

Note: You may narrow your search by selecting more than one filter below.

Julia Somody

M.A., R.Psych
I am passionate about helping people and organizations change and thrive. I am a non-judgmental, compassionate therapist who provides assistance with a variety of issues, including anxiety and stress management,... Read more

Anne Erlebach

Ph.D., CCC
Life can be full of challenges and problems that cause stress, confusion, anger, insecurity, indecision, shame, physical pain, illness, exhaustion and lethargy, frustration, worry, anxiety, guilt, regret, grief,... Read more