Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Perfectionism Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) - Romanian Language

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Perfectionism

Through the media, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder has become quite well known.
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, or as it's commonly known, OCD is a common anxiety disorder in which a person feels fear, worry, apprehension and other intrusive thoughts. Most people diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder report childhood onset of symptoms, which could lead to a range of ongoing anxiety disorders.

It is common for the person to perform repetitive behaviors that are meant to reduce anxiety. A person can develop a range of compulsions or obsessions. Someone who has Obsessive Compulsive Disorder will repeatedly check on things (such as locking doors, switching off lights, etc.), obsessively wash their hands or clean their homes excessively.

In some cases, a person might become preoccupied with religious, violent or sexual thoughts, or have relationship-based obsession. They may become averse to certain words or numbers and perform nervous rituals, such as performing a certain routine repeatedly.

To other people, a person with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder might seem paranoid. It could cause stress in a relationship or family, and could lead to severe financial or emotional distress. Since most people with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder recognize their behavior as irrational, it can cause them even more distress.

Cognitive Behavioural therapy offers a range of techniques to assist people with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. A specific technique used in OCD is exposure and response prevention (ERP). This technique teaches a person with OCD to gradually learn to tolerate the anxieties caused by not continuing the rituals. Counsellors perform this and other therapies in a safe and non-judgmental environment.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers Obsessive Compulsive Disorder  to help with your repetitive, compulsive behaviour issues you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Perfectionism is considered as a personality trait among many mental health practitioners.  Perfectionists tend to view projects or tasks that are not perfect done, as unworthy. Unless they know that they can do something perfectly, they are unlikely to take it on. They tend not to care much about the learning process while completing a task, but rather about the end project, which, for them, is the most important aspect of any project they undertake.

Procrastination is a great obstacle with people who are perfectionists. They usually don't want to start a task until they are sure that they can do it perfectly. It's common for them to spend an enormous amount of time on a project, making sure that it is done to perfection. Yet, perfectionism prevents these people from appreciating a job well done. Instead, they don't believe that anything they do is good enough and they constantly compare their results with that of other people. They become fixated on achieving perfection.

There is a correlation between perfectionism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and some perfectionists also have OCD.  However, not all people with OCD are perfectionists. While most people with an ambition to succeed and therefore strive to excel in their pursuits, they are not necessarily perfectionists.

Therapy can be very helpful in treating perfectionism. Therapy will help the individual to reframe their thinking to change the end goal of his or her undertakings. A therapist may often help perfectionists recognize that some of the most successful people are not perfectionists at all.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers therapies to address your perfectionism or OCD issues, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), Dialectical Behaviour Therapy

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is a psychological approach that deals with the way in which clients think about themselves, other people and the world. The outside world affects how we think and feel about ourselves and as a result, our behaviour. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy can help a person to change the way they think about thoughts and feelings, but it is not like other types of talk therapy.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy focuses on current issues and challenges that affect the client right now. It doesn't consider the past issues that caused distress, but rather looks for solutions that can improve the client's state of mind in the moment. Much of CBT involves looking at thought distortions that can affect mood and are affected by mood, and helps client examine and challenge distorted thinking patters.

CBT can help a range of problems, from OCD, PTSD, bulimia, stress, phobias and other issues that might seem overwhelming to the client, by breaking them down into smaller, more manageable chunks.

If you are looking for a therapist who offers Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, please browse our list of practitioners below..

Dialectical Behaviour Therapy is helpful in helping clients who suffer from a wide range of mental health issues. It is most commonly used for people that are having problems managing their emotions. It typically includes individual and group sessions with focus on skill learning of attention, managing emotions and interpersonal skills.

Dialectical Behaviour Therapy helps individuals to cope with stressful situations and distressing emotions to help improve their interpersonal relationships. During times of stress, a person usually acts automatically with no regard for consequences, and this often leads to self-destructive behaviours such as self-harm, manipulation and poor eating and sleeping habits. Dialectical Behaviour Therapy can help a client to make better decisions.

During sessions, the therapist will discuss different viewpoints, because they share the theory that opposites can, and do, co-exist. The therapist will teach the client helpful skills that will help the client to accept or change a situation.

If you are looking for a therapist who offers Dialectical Behaviour Therapy, please browse our list of practitioners below..

Romanian

This page contains names of counselling professionals who speak Romanian.  Meeting with a counsellor or psychologist who speaks Danish may be your preference because of your comfort talking about feelings in your native language.

Gabriela Ionita

Ph.D., R.Psych
I am a Registered Psychologist providing therapy to children, youth, and their families in North Vancouver (at Nova Mental Health). My focus is on creating a warm, collaborative, and engaging atmosphere while... Read more