Chronic Pain, Death and Dying Brief Therapy

Chronic Pain, Death and Dying

Chronic pain brings hundreds of people to therapy every week. Many physical and psychological issues can cause chronic pain and it is important to rule out any medical causes and get treatment by speaking to a physician.

Some people experience chronic pain as the result of untreated emotional overwhelm, unexpressed anger, depression or grief. Symptoms of chronic pain typically include headaches; muscle tension, pain or fatigue;  shooting nerve pains, and tension in the back, neck and shoulders.

Many people with chronic pain disorder are reluctant to explore the emotional causes of their pain for fear of being told that they are inventing the symptoms. However, true somaticizing is a very real condition in which the emotions are unable to leave the body.

Another reason why people are loathe to admit the emotional roots of their pain, is that they fear that there would be no medical cure. Chronic pain with an emotional root requires that they confront the emotions that have been hidden away, and this can be challenging.

Therapists and psychologists who do  chronic pain therapy offer a confidential and safe environment in which people can explore pent-up emotions and as a result experience short term and long term relief. Symptoms caused by long term emotional build-up may require long-term treatment and due to the physical changes, some medical intervention and active physiotherapy is often very important as well.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who works with chronic pain you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Death and dying are common issues faced by people who seek counselling. When a loved one passes away,  dormant feelings of rejection, separation and abandonment in a person's life history tend to resurface. Every client has a different reaction to death and dying, a topic that has been a taboo in many cultures.

Many people are ill-equipped to deal with death and dying, and the process of adjustment that naturally has to follow such an event. During the grieving process, a person tends to react emotionally, but their character usually doesn't change. They are bound to review their relationship with the deceased individual, and express the unfairness of the death. The grieving person might seek out other people to replace the deceased, while at the same time revising their current relationships and personal identity.

The mourning process consists of a number of stages, that most people experience. The stages usually occur consecutively, but it's natural to experience them in a different order, to experience more than one at a time, or to skip a stage altogether. Some people have reported regressing to a previous stage, and moving back and forth between stages.

Unresolved grief can lead to psychopathology. It takes a strong person to seek help and therapy can help you realize that mourning is a natural process that allows you to explore life after the loss of a loved one. It will help you to find new coping mechanisms and help you to move forward with a life that does not include him or her.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who works with clients who are grieving the loss of someone, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Brief Therapy

Brief therapy focuses on a client's present and future, rather than his or her past and it builds solutions. Many brief therapists never explore their clients' past problems, but rather focus on the present with goals for creating a positive future.

Psychologists who offer brief therapy take a more pro-active approach to offer faster care for subjective and clinical conditions. This type of therapy creates natural resources and temporarily suspends disbelief to help the client consider a range of new viewpoints or perspectives. It provides a wider context for the client to view the present, and better understandings that can bring about spontaneous change.

Unlike other therapies that focus on the problem, brief therapy is solution-based. It removes the factors that sustain a problem and prevent change. Brief therapists understands that there are many approaches that, combined, can bring about ultimate success.

If you are looking for a therapist who offers brief therapy, please browse our list of practitioners below..

Note: You may narrow your search by selecting more than one filter below.

Sarah Hickinbottom

Ph.D., RCC
PLEASE NOTE: CURRENTLY NOT ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS; WAITLIST ONLY Counselling for Individuals Facing Significant Personal and/or Professional Transitions Sarah's practice is focused on working collaboratively... Read more