Depression Animal Assisted Therapy

Depression

Depression is the most common psychological condition, and most people experience it at one point or another in their lives.

Symptoms of depression include lethargy, low self esteem, a feeling of sadness, helplessness, hopelessness, anxiety, dysphoric mood and even suicidal thoughts. People who are depressed usually feel a lack of energy and a lack of pleasure and they may be agitated or irritable.

Since there are so many causes to depression, which boils down to a natural response to life experiences (a defence mechanism), each situation warrants a thorough investigation into the exact catalyst. Depending on what causes a specific incidence of depression, a treatment plan can be developed to help the individual deal with his or her emotions.

Some people are predisposed to depression in that it can run in the family. In many cases, it is learned when someone is constantly exposed to it.

Counselling can help a person to adapt to life changes that are causing grief, particularly with bereavement or marital issues. Systemic therapy is helpful in family therapy, where the efforts of the whole family can help the individual. Psychodynamic therapy helps a person to find the hidden psychological defences that cause problems to manifest. Cognitive behavioral therapy focuses on the problem at hand, providing solutions to day-to-day issues and finding ways to restructure negative thought patterns.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who has training and experience in depression counselling you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Animal Assisted Therapy

Animal-assisted therapy uses animals, and dogs in particular, to improve cognitive and emotional functioning. Animals help to build a report between the therapist and the patient, and can include domesticated pets and farm animals.

During the first stages of animal-assisted therapy, the therapist will assess the client's needs without animals present. The animal is only introduced once the therapist has developed a treatment plan.

The next stage involves a bond being developed between the client and the animal through motor skills. The animals are used to motivate the client, and to create positive interactions that can be translated into human interaction.

The therapist will monitor improvement and once a positive interaction is established between the client and the animal, the client is given independence in making choices for their partner in Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) therapy.

If you are looking for a counsellor who offers Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) therapy, please browse our list of practitioners below..

Note: You may narrow your search by selecting more than one filter below.

Rosanne Johnson

M.A., RCC
As a counsellor, Rosanne offers therapy to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community in Greater Vancouver and Burnaby. She understands how important it is for these populations to have a therapist who... Read more

Alexandra Cope

M.Couns., RCC
I provide traditional talk therapy at ARC Counselling in Vancouver.  My counselling approach is primarily person centred. I believe that you have a unique journey and have within yourself the resources needed for... Read more

Bonnie Mason

M.A., RCC
Bonnie Mason and Associates currently has six  associates providing services to White Rock and South Surrey, Melanie Huck, Tia Noble,  Sherri Calder, Leanne Fessler, Eva Pedersen and Teal Maedel... Read more

Megan Pinfield

Ph.D., RCC
 I have been practicing as a clinical counsellor for over 15 years. I specialize in working with individuals having difficulty creating the kinds of relationships they want in their life. Nobody is broken. But... Read more

Dawn Holt

M.A., RCC
With 15 years of experience, education and expertise in the mental health field, I have been honoured to help clients access their own strengths, gain insight and build skills to improve their lives. Helping people Feel... Read more