Eating Disorders, Professional Burnout Acceptance & Commitment Therapy

Eating Disorders, Professional Burnout

Eating disorders comprise a range of attitudes and behaviors relating to food and body-image. The three main eating disorders are Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia, and ED NOS (eating disorder not otherwise specified). These conditions manifest to different degrees in different people and can sometimes be mistakenly judged as poor eating habits, or a lack of willpower.

People with eating disorders don't eat in harmony with their bodies' needs, instead, people with Anorexia Nervosa eat much less than they need, while Bulimia sufferers binge and then induce vomiting. They may also do other things to compensate for overeating, including exercising or fasting. ED NOS combines any combination of the other two conditions.

Apart from the physical symptoms and behaviors above, someone with an eating disorder will generally also have poor self-esteem and obsessively research or talk about food, dieting or exercise. Poor body image will cause them to either wear clothes that cover up every inch of their bodies, or flaunt  in order to attract attention. They will find it hard to accept criticism and compliments.

Therapy for eating disorders depend on the patient. While some people respond well to short term outpatient treatment, others respond better to long-term inpatient treatment. Cognitive behavioral therapy and family therapy are long term treatments that have been proven to be effective, while group therapy, psychodynamic psychotherapies and feminist therapies work for people who will respond well to short term therapy.

Family therapy is often advised for children and adolescents who are experiencing eating disorders. Research has also shown dialectical behavioral therapy to be effective.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who addresses eating disorders, you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Professional burnout is becoming more common in people who have to carve careers in this competitive economy. While there are more and better opportunities for people to advance their careers, there are also more issues that add to stress in the workplace.

Typically, professional burnout is caused by issues such as endless tasks, under-employment, inadequate pay, difficult clients, bureaucracy, conflicting roles, and perfectionism. Some of the more difficult causes include deficits in emotional and social skills and conflicts between workplace and personal values.

A person who is dealing with professional burnout will usually feel extreme physical and emotional exhaustion, as the result of prolonged stressed. Cynicism and low levels of career satisfaction, or even indifference are common symptoms of professional burnout. People with professional burnout will struggle to concentrate and have poor problem solving abilities.

Professional burnout can cause a range of health problems as a result of chronic stress, and symptoms may include insomnia, headaches, and frequent colds. People often self-medicate and start using substances such as sleeping pills, alcohol, mood elevators or cigarettes, which pose more serious health risks.

A therapists who offers professional burnout will be able to help the person to identify issues that could lead to burnout. He or she will help identify stressors and find solutions, or even help you define the best career for you by using standardized tests that measure strengths and weaknesses.

Some careers predispose people to professional burnout, such as police officers, customer care consultants, lawyers, nurses, social workers and teachers. Emotional involvement in high stress environments make professional burnout prevalent in these professions.  

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers professional burnout counselling and other career-related issues you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Acceptance & Commitment Therapy

Acceptance & Commitment Therapy encompasses a range of six principles that aim to help clients develop greater psychological flexibility. The six principles include:

1. Cognitive defusion help to reduce tendencies to regard thoughts, memories and emotions as real and concrete events.

2. Acceptance is about allowing the thoughts to surface and pass without the need to allow them to interfere with daily life.

3.  Being present means being aware of current existence and being involved with the now.

4. Self observation helps the client to be aware of the self and the unchanging consciousness.

5. Exploring values to discover those that are most important to the person.

6. Committed action involves setting goals based on the explored values, and setting actions in place to reach those goals.

Acceptance & Commitment Therapy is a form of cognitive behavioural therapy and is commonly used in therapy, and in it's sub-forms and helpful for a range of conditions, including OCD. If you require Acceptance & Commitment Therapy, have a look at the counsellors listed below.

Julia Somody

M.A., R.Psych
I am passionate about helping people and organizations change and thrive. I am a non-judgmental, compassionate therapist who provides assistance with a variety of issues, including anxiety and stress management,... Read more