Grief and Loss - General, Retirement Acceptance & Commitment Therapy

Grief and Loss - General, Retirement

Grief is a natural part of dealing with the loss of a loved one, or a situation, or a way in which we see ourselves. Loss requires that we change the way things used to be and find a new way to restructure our lives accordingly. It's common for people to fear change, particularly if a part of us, or a person we loved deeply, is no longer there. It leaves a gap that has to be filled, but nothing can replace the person who has left us behind.

People deal with loss in many different ways, but the desired end result is the same - trying to piece together the puzzle to the best of our ability, without the missing piece. We also go through the various stages of grief at varying speeds and intensities. Dealing with all the emotions that form part of grief is what makes support so very important.

Time is of the essence during the grieving period, and something we sometimes tend to rush. That's why it's so useful to speak to a therapist who does grief counselling during this time.

A therapist will help you understand that what you are feeling is completely normal and even expected. Medical professionals are aware of the wide range of natural responses to grief and loss and are generally reluctant to diagnose mental illness while a person is in a period of bereavement. However, if depression is present, medication is likely to be prescribed.

Grief therapy will help you to accept the loss and be able to talk about it without breaking down. You will learn to identify and express your emotions regarding the loss and learn to make decisions without your loved one.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist does grief counselling to address your grief and loss you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Retirement can sometimes bring about mixed emotions. Some people grab the opportunity with both hands, while others have a different vision of it. However, most people do see it as the end of an era and the beginning of a new life with many unknown challenges. It is quite natural to feel a sense of anxiety at the prospect of changing your life so drastically.

People who have had an active, successful career are more likely to become depressed at retirement. However, life expectancy is on the increase and people have more disposable money resources, which contribute to a better quality of life, and that opens up the opportunity for living a new and exciting life.

However, without proper planning and creating structure, there is a lot of insecurity. It is common to feel depressed and overwhelmed. If you feel like nervous about the prospect of retirement, or if you need assistance in deciding what to do with your life when you stop working in formal employment, it might be a good idea to speak to a therapist.

A psychologist or counsellor who offers coaching people before, during and after retirement will help to bring stress symptoms to normal levels, and help you to understand your personal qualities. He or she will help you to find ways to fill up the empty time and finding purpose, using your personal life goals and aspirations as a guide.

Goals change over the years as you evolve as a person and it is important to change your actions to ensure that you live life to the fullest.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who offers retirement counselling to address your stress, and anxiety due to retirement you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Acceptance & Commitment Therapy, Critical Incident Stress Management

Acceptance & Commitment Therapy encompasses a range of six principles that aim to help clients develop greater psychological flexibility. The six principles include:

1. Cognitive defusion help to reduce tendencies to regard thoughts, memories and emotions as real and concrete events.

2. Acceptance is about allowing the thoughts to surface and pass without the need to allow them to interfere with daily life.

3.  Being present means being aware of current existence and being involved with the now.

4. Self observation helps the client to be aware of the self and the unchanging consciousness.

5. Exploring values to discover those that are most important to the person.

6. Committed action involves setting goals based on the explored values, and setting actions in place to reach those goals.

Acceptance & Commitment Therapy is a form of cognitive behavioural therapy and is commonly used in therapy, and in it's sub-forms and helpful for a range of conditions, including OCD. If you require Acceptance & Commitment Therapy, have a look at the counsellors listed below.

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Susan Higginbottom

Ph.D., R.Psych
I  received my Doctorate in Clinical Psychology from Queen's University at Kingston Ontario in 1991.  I  have extensive experience in the diagnosis and treatment of a wide spectrum of clinical... Read more