Chronic Illness, LGBTQ Issues Counsellors

Chronic Illness, LGBTQ Issues

Chronic illness has the ability to affect you in more ways than just medically. In fact, it can impact you psychologically. The degree of impact is dependent on the person's personality and the circumstances before the diagnosis. Support structure plays an important role on a person's ability to cope, but oftentimes, a person has to go through various stages of dealing with the condition before they are able to adjust to the realities of the chronic illness.

When a person is diagnosed with a chronic illness, he or she will go through a number of stages similar to the stages of grief. Denial, disbelief and shock are just some of the emotions a person experiences when a diagnosis is made, and it's natural for them to resist major changes. Eventually, they will become exhausted, when all they really want to do is to recover. At that point, fear and anxiety will set in and worry in the face of uncertainty of the future.

Sadness, grief and depression are common emotions when they consider the possibility of lost goals, hopes and dreams. Losing independence is a real fear, which becomes inevitable if an illness progresses and that brings about the fear of being a burden to loved ones, which brings on more anger, resentment and even shame.

Counselling can help a person to deal with the emotions relating to chronic illness and to cope with the stress and anxieties of accepting and coping with life changes. It will help to regain personal control over life and yourself.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who works with in chronically ill individuals you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Counselling for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer individuals makes the transition to living true to yourself easier. While acceptance of GLBTQ people is on the rise, it can still be stressful for some. Speaking to someone about your fears and struggles can make the transition easier.


While GLBTQ people are more easily accepted than years ago, there are still some homophobic elements that discriminate against the movement and people who form part of it.

Despite the strides made in public acceptance by the GLBTQ community, they still face many issues that require psychological or counselling intervention. Depression caused by discrimination is one of the main issues that counselling addresses, as well as religious abuse, homophobic work and living conditions, self-destructive behavior, assault, and family estrangement or rejection.


HIV and AIDS issues are serious concerns faced by gay people who might be in denial and practice unsafe sex. Some people will develop anxiety about being tested, and coping with results, while others might face the trauma of caring for a loved one with AIDS.

In the past, GLBTQ counselling was not as freely available as it is today, but the demand has risen as the community realised that it offers a safe and non-judgmental environment for people to get help. Today, counselling helps thousands of people to live freely and healthily without a fear of judgment, through specific support services and counselling that helps Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer people as well as their friends and families to live harmoniously.

If you are looking for a counsellor or psychologist who works with the GLBTQ commuity you may want to search the directory to find a professional whose approach will suit you best.

Note: You may narrow your search by selecting more than one filter below.

Anthony Cave

M.A., R.Psych
    • In-Person Sessions
About me My private practice consists of psychotherapy services for youth, adults and elders. An appointment usually lasts an hour and takes place in a confidential office setting. I also provide clinical consulting... Read more